Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. (updated everyday)


Unit 1:

The situation is improving, but we’re not out of the woods yet.
Out of the woods: free from difficulties.
I’ll probably take a back seat and let Marco do most of the work
Take a back seat: become less actively involved in something
My heart sank when I saw the hotel room they’d given us.
One’s heart sank: disappointed, sad about something.
  •          Glossary:

-       -  Having said that, a Clause.: used to say that something is true, undoubted.
-       - The next thing one knows/knew, a Clause: suddenly, without warning.
-       - I thought as much, a Clause: not surprised that something is true.
Will they lose? More than likely.
Very Likely
I’d be hard pressed to name all the countries in Europe.
Find it difficult to do something.
I think Ann got out of bed on the wrong side this morning.
In a bad mood.
  •         Glossary:

-                   -       A sore point: something makes you sad or angry when sb talks about or mentions it.

-       Put foot in one’s mouth = put your foot in it: accidentally make someone upset  or annoys after you say something.
-       It serves somebody right (for having done or doing something): somebody deserved something unpleasant or bad that happens to them.
-       Not do a stroke of work: not do any work at all.
-       Take it personally: feel that a failure is your fault.
      
     Practice:
*


Unit 2:

They’ve decided to wait for the dust to settle = let the dust settle, wait until the dust settles
Wait until the situation gets settled, calm, better
I am sure we are on the right track.
Doing something correctly.
  •        Glossary:

-          -  Be on the ropes: having a serious problem and may fail.

-       - Be in a tight corner: in a serious situation and may not easily get out.
-       - Play cards close to one’s chest: always keep one’s plans or ideas secret.
-       - Strike while the iron is hot: make use of the opportunity quickly.
-       - Have a chip on one’s shoulder: be much sensitive to anything now as a result of something that had happened to him or her before.
-       - Be in the driving seat: a person is controlling the situation.
  •          Practice:


Unit 3: (updated)


-     The plane urgently put down on the highway.
-   Put down somewhere = land (v)
-     She is going to put her name down for our yearly polls as class monitor.

-     Jane’s old cat is too weak, so she is thinking about putting it down.

-     My boss usually takes his frustration out on his employees. I, of-course, am not exceptional, so I think he puts his anger down to stress.

-     Her brother put her up to making some prank calls to 113.


-     She counts on me to do her homework.
-  Put one’s name down for = write one’s name on a list so that they can join in something.

-  Put animals down (normally in passive) = an activity of mercy killing (using drugs).

-  Put something down to something else: be believed that thing is caused by something else


-  put somebody up to something or doing something = encourage somebody to do something wrong.

- Believe or trust somebody to do something



Share on Google Plus

About tri vo kim

Thank you for spending your precious time to have flipped thru lessons. I am doing my best to upload more and more selective articles with further elaboration of vocabulary and structure. Bookmark my Blog for keeping updated with latest lessons or drop me some lines via my BBM: 2C275701